DEVIN BOND
Thoughts of a wanna-be author and student.


April 22, 2011

S is for Scenes and Senses

When I write, I think in term of scenes, not chapters. When I think of them as scenes, it helps me get a complete picture of what's going to go on at that moment. I don't know why chapters can't do that, too, but there seems to be some sort of disconnect between my brain and the word chapter.

Maybe one of the reasons why is because when I write the story appears like a movie in my head and I'm trying to describe what's going on in that scene. Do you write in scenes or chapters?

As for senses, I'm really trying my best to utilize every sense I can in my MS. I want people to get the way Ax feels right away. I want them to get a good picture for how it would be like to actually live in this world. That's one thing that books have over movies. Movies might paint a better picture--but a book can bring you to the world. I can describe the dullness of the world easily with just sight, but I feel like adding how the place smells and  how the air tastes--the sounds and touches, the temperature--will be so much more vivid.

May seem obvious, but there are a lot of writers who skimp out on those other 5 senses. Yeah, we have them in when our MC smells some delicious food or touches something gross... Obvious places, where any other sense would make everyone go "Um... What?"

How many of you succeed on utilizing as many senses as possible?

7 comments:

  1. I tend to write in chapters rather than scenes, but my chapters tend to be either an entire scene or two scenes depending on length. :)

    As for senses, I love writing taste, smell etc., into my MS.

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  2. I tend to write in chapters as opposed to scenes. I plot ahead of time on a storyboard on my computer and devise where I want the chapter to end and try to come up with a cliffhanger so that there's an excuse for the reader to carry on to the next page.

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  3. I write in chapters, but each chapter will generally have at least 2 scenes, maybe more.

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  4. Hey Devin ~~ I'm popping in from the A~Z Challenge . I agree with you whole-heartedly that a written story conveys so much more than a movie , in terms of the senses .
    Interesting post & Happy S Day !

    ~MICHELLE~
    http://writer-in-transit.co.za/category/other/rambles-rants-and-raves/

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  5. I tend to write in sights and sounds, but I keep trying to put other sense appeals in my stories. It helps when I can get other readers to go over what I've written and suggest places for changes.

    I'm starting up a 'Critiquing Crusaders' program, where participants in the Second Crusade can find other writers to exchange critiques with or form critiquing circles. If you're interested, come by The Kelworth Files to check it out!

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  6. I write in scenes. My outline is in scenes, too, not chapters. lol I always try to remember to put in as many senses as possible. Particularly in the beginning of each scene. Harder to work the senses into the middle of a scene, for some reason.

    BTW - Is this background new? Your blog looks different. But good! I like the look.

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  7. Lindsay - I see. That's pretty cool!

    Michael - You've gotta love cliffhangers! They're basically the best.

    Trisha - That must mean your chapters are pretty meaty. Thanks for stopping by!

    Muso-blog-hog - Yay! We're 100% agreed on that matter! Thanks for visiting. :)

    Kelworthfiles - Critiques are always great to see where you need knew things. Thanks for the info, I'll definitely check it out.

    Storytreasury - Another scene outliner! Wooot! I do think that it's harder to get senses into the middle of them, too. More action then!

    And yes, the background is new. :) Thanks~ I'm glad you like it.

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I like reading what you've got to say, so go ahead and make my day! :)